Celibacy, Atrahasis, Zoroastrianism, And Wolves

http://www.livius.org/fa-fn/flood/flood3-t-atrahasis.html

Above is a link to a ancient story of a flood called the flood story of Atrahasis. There are a number of old flood stories. One of them is in the bible and involves Noah and his ark. Another one is in vedic literature. And there is a flood story in the story of Gilgamesh which is an old sumerian myth. The ancient world has many flood stories.

In the flood story of Atrahasis there is a flood that engulfs the whole world. Atrahasis survives on an ark and after he returns to land he is given instructions on what to do. The flood occurred because the gods felt there was too many people on the planet and the gods claimed that people were being too noisy and thus bothering the gods. The instructions the gods gave to Atrahasis after he returned to land were to establish monastic orders where some of the population was celibate in an effort to combat the potential of overopulation.

As far as the issue of overpopulation goes I do not advocate that people be hurt in order to  combat overpopulation. I am against abortion. However people voluntarily being celibate is something which I am not opposed to.

Celibacy is not for everyone though. Some people prefer chastity to celibacy. The difference between chastity and celibacy is that chaste people avoid masturbation yet they have sex in order to make babies. A celibate person avoids all sexual activity. If a person avoids sex but does engage in masturbation they are not being celibate, in that case they are a wanker.

A quote from the link regarding monastic celibacy

etablish high priestesses and priestesses,
let them be taboo [celibate], and so cut down childbirth.

Those who are breeders should aim to be chaste. By conserving the sexual energy one should aim to transmute the sexual energy into spiritual sentiment. Both the celibate and the chaste breeder should work to transmute the sexual energy.

The Zoroastrian faith has a flood myth as well. Above is a Zoroastrian prayer/mantra/proverb. According to Zoroastrianism one should work to think good thoughts, say good words, and do good deeds. In order to think good thoughts, say good words, and do good deeds one must be in touch with ones conscience and to be in touch with ones conscience one should be in a constant state of prayer because it is by praying that one is reminded of God and by being reminded of God one is reminded of sin and by being reminded of sin one is reminded of ones conscience.

The ancient Zoroastrians were a vegetarian people.

http://zoroastrianheritage.blogspot.com/2011/07/were-ancient-iranians-zoroastrians.html

Below is a link to a website devoted to Zoroastrian revival.

http://www.zoroastrianism.cc/

***

Some people claim that celibacy is unnatural and that all humans should reproduce. Well let us take a look at nature then. Among wolf packs in the wild there are only a few wolves in a pack who are breeders. The other wolves in the pack do not breed.

http://www.wolfweb.com/facts-pack.html

It is not being implied which is better: chastity or celibacy. One will have to find for oneself whether one is a breeder or not. But one must think on this carefully.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in animals, chastity and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Celibacy, Atrahasis, Zoroastrianism, And Wolves

  1. tryingtobeagoodman says:

    You wrote:

    “As far as the issue of overpopulation goes I do not advocate that people be hurt in order to combat overpopulation. I am against abortion. However people voluntarily being celibate is something which I am not opposed to.

    Celibacy is not for everyone though. Some people prefer chastity to celibacy. The difference between chastity and celibacy is that chaste people avoid masturbation yet they have sex in order to make babies.”

    I agree.

    I’m opposed to abortion, but I’m still concerned about overpulation. It seems like a lot of Christians do not want to consider the idea that overpopulation is a real possibility that needs to be addressed from different angles. Maybe they’re right; maybe it isn’t a real threat. But with all the environmental issues and food issues (like Genetically Modified (GM) foods) it seems that it wouldn’t hurt for us to start asking some important questions about possible overpopulation. After all, genetically modified foods by greedy corporations who tell us that we can’t feed the world with the old, conventional foods.

    “Among wolf packs in the wild there are only a few wolves in a pack who are breeders. The other wolves in the pack do not breed.”

    I am supporter of eugenics, if practiced in an ethical way. In fact, our current approach to procreation seems immoral, allowing anyone and everyone to breed as much as they want. If we really cared about the future, we would be more selective about breeding. At least that’s how I feel at the moment. My ideas change.

    Take care guys. God bless you. Very interesting blog.

    • Do you think eugenics should be practiced by the state? I am opposed to the state enacting eugenics programs. However in the past people practiced arranged marriages which are in some ways a form of eugenics and I am not opposed to arranged marriages.

      • tryingtobeagoodman says:

        I agree with you.

        I don’t want the state, at least not in its present form, deciding who gets to have children.

        I also agree that arranged marriages aren’t such a horrible thing, especially if one’s parents are truly wise and loving.

        I think in an ideal world, individuals and/or couples would take an honest look at themselves and ask God whether or not He wants them to have children. They could get input from the community too. “We’re thinking about having children, what do y’all think?”

        This might work in a close-knit, God-loving community.

        Honestly, I haven’t given this subject (eugenics) a ton of thought. I have a general idea or vision in my head, though.

        Take care, Brother Catfish.

  2. humbahaha says:

    The relationship between the various flood myths you mention is interesting. The story in the epic of Gilgamesh is borrowed directly from Atrahasis with some minor modifications. The biblical story is so similar that we can safely assume it was based on the much older Mesopotamian tale. There are also related versions of the flood story in the so called “Eridu Genesis” (Sumerian) and the Sumerian Gilgamesh poem, the Death of Gilgamesh. Cultic celibacy was not the only solution introduced in Atrahasis, by the way. It also mentions still births and, due to gaps in the text, there may have been other measures introduced as well. Furthermore, in the Death of Gilgamesh we read that the gods limited human life span after the flood. This is interesting as something similar seems to be indicated at the beginning of the flood story in Genesis. In stark contrast to the Sumerian and Akkadian flood stories, though, Noah’s family is told to ‘be fruitful and increase in number and fill the earth’ after the deluge. My own feeling is that this reflects Israel’s international perspective as a relatively small, insignificant nation that may have been captive and subject to Babylon when the Genesis story was put into its current form. It is no coincidence that the flood represented the punishment of an overpopulous slave race in Atrahasis while Genesis moralizes this to the judgement of a corrupt and violent civilization.

    • If you look at the stories of the bible they seem to be a collection of ideas from all over the middle east. Much of levitical law is borrowed from the egyptian book of the dead, the idea of their being a devil is borrowed from persian zoroastrianism, as you say the flood story is based on babylonian stories… and I’m sure there is a significant portion of the bible that originated among the jewish people themselves. Circumcision in the middl east seems to be a practice that immigrated to the middle east from Africa… African tribes to this day practice circumcision as part of initiation rituals.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s